Contact Details

Siyakhana Garden
Bezuidenhout Park
Observatory Avenue
Erf 144, Region F
Johannesburg
2094

Prof. Michael Rudolph - Director and Founder
michael@siyakhana.org
mikerud@telkomsa.net
+27 82 492 4768

Florian Kroll - Programme Head
flo@siyakhana.org
+27 72 501 0756

Nikki Richard - Research, Projects and Communication
nikki@discoverymail.co.za
+27 82 774 6085

Paula van Eeden
paula@siyakhana.org
+27 61 060 0101

 

About Siyakhana

Wits Siyakhana Initiative
Wits Siyakhana Initiative (WSI) functions as a change agent to engage individuals and organizations in Joburg City, Gauteng and across the entire spectrum of the South and Southern African society to promote health, improve food security and enhance environments. This is achieved through building capacity via training programmes at all academic levels, establishing pioneering trans-disciplinary research and making a significant contribution to civil society. As a leading incubator and repository of knowledge and best practice relating to food security, urban agriculture and agro-ecology.

Transformation in Action
Back in 2005, the acre of land that is now a thriving social enterprise was a bone-dry and barren terrain that unassumingly blended into the rest of Bezuidenhout Park. It took a dream and lots of hard work for that land to become a locally, nationally and globally recognized hub for knowledge, growth, research and social change.

WSI began as a 1-hectare food garden that supplied a wide range of fresh fruits, vegetables, maize, and herbs to local ECDCs and NGOs that provided home-based care to HIV+/AIDS patients and their dependents. Since then, the garden has transformed and expanded to become a city-, region-, nation- and even world-wide demonstration site, training and research hub.

Siyakhana has achieved the following:

  • Transforming a dumpsite into a flourishing garden
  • Transforming mindsets with regards to health and nutrition
  • Transforming unemployment into entrepreneurial opportunities and employment
  • Transforming entrenched attitudes into sustainable practices


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